The God Effect: Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon

The God Effect Quantum Entanglement Science s Strangest Phenomenon The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be trueWhat is entanglement It s a connection between quantum particles the building blocks of the universe Once two particles are entan

  • Title: The God Effect: Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon
  • Author: Brian Clegg
  • ISBN: 9780312343415
  • Page: 143
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be trueWhat is entanglement It s a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected instantly in the other, be they in the same lab or light years apart So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implicatiThe phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be trueWhat is entanglement It s a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected instantly in the other, be they in the same lab or light years apart So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it spooky and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the God Effect, was one of Einstein s few and perhaps one of his greatest mistakes What does it mean The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today s machines in speed and power, teleportation, and In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an exceptionally readable and fascinating and equation free account of entanglement, its history, and its application Fans of Brian Greene and Amir Aczel and those interested in the marvelous possibilities coming down the quantum road will find much to marvel, illuminate, and delight.

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    About “Brian Clegg

    • Brian Clegg

      Brian s latest books, Ten Billion Tomorrows and How Many Moons does the Earth Have are now available to pre order He has written a range of other science titles, including the bestselling Inflight Science, The God Effect, Before the Big Bang, A Brief History of Infinity, Build Your Own Time Machine and Dice World.Along with appearances at the Royal Institution in London he has spoken at venues from Oxford and Cambridge Universities to Cheltenham Festival of Science, has contributed to radio and TV programmes, and is a popular speaker at schools Brian is also editor of the successful popularscience book review site and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.Brian has Masters degrees from Cambridge University in Natural Sciences and from Lancaster University in Operational Research, a discipline originally developed during the Second World War to apply the power of mathematics to warfare It has since been widely applied to problem solving and decision making in business.Brian has also written regular columns, features and reviews for numerous publications, including Nature, The Guardian, PC Week, Computer Weekly, Personal Computer World, The Observer, Innovative Leader, Professional Manager, BBC History, Good Housekeeping and House Beautiful His books have been translated into many languages, including German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Polish, Turkish, Norwegian, Thai and even Indonesian.

    570 thoughts on “The God Effect: Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon

    • I am really undecided about this book, which I really wanted to like. To be honest, while there are some sections that are done brilliantly, there are unfortunately some examples/experiments that are not described clearly and where the hand-waving is really a bit too much. I did not particularly like the section on relativity either: I can easily remember several other books where relativity is explained still in a concise but in a much more clear manner.In summary, I found that the book is unev [...]


    • (Cross-posted from my blog at thebartbooks/2009)Anton Chekhov once said that if you say in the first chapter of your book that there is a rifle hanging on the wall, in the second or third chapter it absolutely must go off. In other words, if the gun is not going to be fired, it shouldn't be hanging prominently on the wall.With that in mind, I looked forward to the author’s discussion of how quantum entanglement could be seen as evidence of an invisible space deity, and was seriously disappoint [...]


    • I read the first 3 chapters of the book’s total of 8 and I just don’t get it. I guess it got too “entangled” for me.


    • I thought the book was pretty good and helped to give me a ok understanding of quantum entanglement which is till a little hard to understand. I also liked it a lot because it talked about Einstien and it showed how he didn't like the concept of it and tried to prove it wrong on several ocasions but only strengthend the theory


    • As a non-physicist who in intrigued by this kind of book, I was very pleased. Although this book is now somewhat outdated, Clegg gives the most understandable explanation I've read so far about the "spookiness" of quantum entanglemant.



    • I've been trying, of late, to learn something about quantum entanglement. You'd think that this subject would have lots of books written about it, given that its basic discovery was made close to 100 years ago, and is intertwined with the famous. celebrated arguments between Einstein, who never really liked the ideas of quantum theory -- probability, God playing dice with the world, and all that), and Bohr, who was the champion of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, and one of it [...]


    • Each time I read a book about quantum physics, I get to understand more and more even though it is very slow to puzzle up a whole picture (due to my limited knowledge of math and physics).This book helped me to understand the meaning of quantum entanglement and the usage in the future. When we can master this entanglement, we will be able to use it on encryption. For 2 sides of the sender and receiver, the entanglement provides a perfect encryption system if they understand the rules. This syste [...]




    • If you are interested in quantum entanglement, this book presents a fairly easy to understand presentation with little use of mathematical formulas.


    • The Clegg book talks about an amazing aspect of quantum theory, which is that when two particles are created that are linked, or entangled, in spin or some other property, and then separated, and then when the spin of one particle is observed the spin of the other is automatically determined no matter how far away it is. This seems to violate the notion of local causality (not to mention the speed of light). The concept was dismissed by most physicists from the start (even Richard Feynman though [...]


    • Quantum Mechanics eerie phenomenon (one of the many) - quantum entanglement - is being described in this book that is clearly written for the non-hardcore-scientist (eg. me). That being said the reader can't just sit back and enjoy the ride, some thinking is necessary and since the topic is part of Quantum Mechanics one needs to be prepared to have ones brain twisted into a pretzel. The chapters describe possible uses for the entanglement effect and why it is so fiendishly difficult to make it w [...]


    • I'm constantly impressed by Brian Clegg's ability capture both the science and the fact of tricky phenomenon. It's not pedantic but necessary to spend fifty pages on the differences between a model and observed fact when talking about something like the quantum behavior of photons going through polarizing filters. I recall having seen the Bell Inequality and eventual Bell Experiments before but the treatment here is phenomenal.The digression regarding the history of cryptography was largely unne [...]


    • If you know anything about quantum entanglement already you will not learning anything new from this book.well that may be a bit harsh. There might be twenty to thirty pages of information on entanglement itself the rest is a history of other topics in which entanglement could be exploited. It for some reason includes a whole chapter (out of 8) about the possibility of sending information instantaneously when he has already proved that no information can transfered through entangled particles. F [...]


    • I was not terribly impressed. This book further solidified my belief that the Higgs Boson does not exit, nor does dark matter, but that these are constructs to fill in the gaps in theories where observations cannot be explained. Some areas were truly ridiculous to even read, such as teleportation. Action at a distance? Show me.


    • Good read. Focuses more on potential applications than theory (since we don't really understand the whys and how's of quantum mechanics anyway), but an interesting survey of what is and is not possible.


    • Offers very little scientific explanation and a lot of extrapolation and tangential trivia. Good if you like that sort of thing I suppose, but for me it was rather frustrating.



    • Interesting concept, but poorly written. How this author manages to make the idea of possible teleportation boring is beyond me, but he does! LOL







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