No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control

No Dig No Fly No Go How Maps Restrict and Control Some maps help us find our way others restrict where we go and what we do These maps control behavior regulating activities from flying to fishing prohibiting students from one part of town from bei

  • Title: No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control
  • Author: Mark Monmonier
  • ISBN: 9780226534688
  • Page: 108
  • Format: Paperback
  • Some maps help us find our way others restrict where we go and what we do These maps control behavior, regulating activities from flying to fishing, prohibiting students from one part of town from being schooled on the other, and banishing certain individuals and industries to the periphery This restrictive cartography has boomed in recent decades as governments seek reSome maps help us find our way others restrict where we go and what we do These maps control behavior, regulating activities from flying to fishing, prohibiting students from one part of town from being schooled on the other, and banishing certain individuals and industries to the periphery This restrictive cartography has boomed in recent decades as governments seek regulate activities as diverse as hiking, building a residence, opening a store, locating a chemical plant, or painting your house anything but regulation colors It is this aspect of mapping its power to prohibit that celebrated geographer Mark Monmonier tackles in No Dig, No Fly, No Go.Rooted in ancient Egypt s need to reestablish property boundaries following the annual retreat of the Nile s floodwaters, restrictive mapping has been indispensable in settling the American West, claiming slices of Antarctica, protecting fragile ocean fisheries, and keeping sex offenders away from playgrounds But it has also been used for opprobrium during one of the darkest moments in American history, cartographic exclusion orders helped send thousands of Japanese Americans to remote detention camps Tracing the power of prohibitive mapping at multiple levels from regional to international and multiple dimensions from property to cyberspace Monmonier demonstrates how much boundaries influence our experience from homeownership and voting to taxation and airline travel A worthy successor to his critically acclaimed How to Lie with Maps, the book is replete with all of the hallmarks of a Monmonier classic, including the wry observations and witty humor.In the end, Monmonier looks far beyond the lines on the page to observe that mapped boundaries, however persuasive their appearance, are not always as permanent and impermeable as their cartographic lines might suggest Written for anyone who votes, owns a home, or aspires to be an informed citizen, No Dig, No Fly No Go will change the way we look at maps forever.

    • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control : by Mark Monmonier µ
      108 Mark Monmonier
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control : by Mark Monmonier µ
      Posted by:Mark Monmonier
      Published :2019-09-02T11:25:12+00:00

    About “Mark Monmonier

    • Mark Monmonier

      Mark Stephen Monmonier is an American author and a Distinguished Professor of Geography at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University.He specializes in toponymy, geography, and geographic information systems His popular written works show a combination of serious study and a sense of humor His most famous work is How To Lie With Maps 1991 , in which he challenges the common belief that maps inherently show an unbiased truth.

    422 thoughts on “No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control

    • This is another nonfiction book given to me by my son. It's by a geographer and is about how maps are used to (mostly) prohibit and control behavior. This one, like many books chosen for me by Stephen, doesn't necessarily leap off the shelf when I'm looking for something entertaining--I mostly gravitate to fiction. But, once I've begun reading them, I find most of his choices thoughtful and interesting. I had enforced reading time yesterday while sitting in a jurors' pool, so I read several chap [...]


    • Not terribly exciting, and too technical for a book that seems to be pitched at a general audience. I also expected a more subversive take from the subtitle, but the book was written more as a straightforward description of the techniques of restrictive cartography.


    • I liked it overall, though which chapters proved more interesting to me was undoubtedly a result of my previous experience with the material. So the sections on redistricting and different ways of constructing a voting district had me feeling bogged down in the details, but I thoroughly enjoyed the sections on things like the township section and property lines. The occasional witty comments sprinkled throughout the text also make it an engaging read.


    • A lighthearted and informative look at how maps restrict our lives, sometime for the good, sometimes for the bad. Ranging from city borders to zoning, the laws of the sea to the control of airspace, coastal determination to the divvying of Antarctica, redlining to electronic monitoring, and lots more. It's all found in this brief, accessible, lively, and at times very funny little book. Definitely recommended.


    • Took me way too long to get through such a slim volume (kept reading in fits and spurts during my commute). And since I work with GIS and planning-related research a lot, some chapters didn't feel very enlightening. But Monmonier has a real talent for making what could be mundane actually seem quite interesting.


    • A surprisingly interesting read on everything from how property lines are made to the divvying up of Antarctica (those crazy Argentines!). A quick useful read if you'd like to contribute to any one of a number of random conversations.


    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *