Ciao Asmara

Ciao Asmara Asmara is the capital of Eritrea a surreally Italian city at the centre of an ex Italian colony that has been at war with its neighbour Ethiopia who claims sovereignty over Eritrea for over ten yea

  • Title: Ciao Asmara
  • Author: Justin Hill
  • ISBN: 9780349115269
  • Page: 394
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • Asmara is the capital of Eritrea a surreally Italian city at the centre of an ex Italian colony that has been at war with its neighbour, Ethiopia who claims sovereignty over Eritrea , for over ten years Amidst broken palaces built by the late Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie , nomadic desert encampments and war torn towns, Justin Hill found a god fearing people remarkAsmara is the capital of Eritrea a surreally Italian city at the centre of an ex Italian colony that has been at war with its neighbour, Ethiopia who claims sovereignty over Eritrea , for over ten years Amidst broken palaces built by the late Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie , nomadic desert encampments and war torn towns, Justin Hill found a god fearing people remarkably resistant to everything fate has thrown at them This book is a tribute to their resilience.

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      Posted by:Justin Hill
      Published :2019-011-09T12:59:44+00:00

    About “Justin Hill

    • Justin Hill

      Justin is an English novelist whose work has twice been nominated for the Man Booker Prize He was born in Freeport, Grand Bahama Island in 1971 and was brought up in York He was educated at St Peter s School, York, and was a member of St Cuthbert s Society, Durham University He worked for seven years as a volunteer with VSO Voluntary Service Overseas in rural China and Africa, before returning home to Yorkshire in 1999 His internationally acclaimed first novel, The Drink and Dream Teahouse, won the 2003 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize and a 2002 Betty Trask Award, and banned by the government in China It was also picked by the Washington Post as one of the Top Novels of 2001.His second novel, Passing Under Heaven, won the 2005 Somerset Maugham Award and was shortlisted for the Encore Award The Independent on Sunday and Sunday Telegraph both picked it for their Christmas Recommended Reads in 2005.Ciao Asmara, a factual account of his time in Eritrea, was shortlisted for the 2003 Thomas Cook Travel Book Award In December 2009, he signed a two book deal with Little, Brown, to publish his Conquest Series His work has been translated into fourteen languages.

    571 thoughts on “Ciao Asmara

    • "The dreams we all had which sparkled for a short while in the hot sun of Eritrea"By sally tarbox on 11 December 2017Format: Kindle EditionJustin Hill went out to Eritrea as a volunteer aid worker in 1996. The country had just emerged from thirty years of conflict with neighbouring Ethiopia, and Hill writes of the aftermath: the damaged buildings but far more importantly a damaged people. Countless deaths; people with horrifying tales to tell; and a sense of malaise as the long fought-for and dr [...]


    • Looking at a map of Africa, this country with so much coast line should be prime real estate. There should be harbors, hotels and snorkeling galore. Unfortunately, what it has had has been war. Maybe even more to come.Last year I read Michela Wong's "I Didn't Do It For You" which details Eritrea's very sad history. Justin Hill's "Ciao Asmara" brings the country much more to life. His light prose style belies strong content and incisive observations.Through his experiences teaching (teachers chas [...]


    • Eritrea, 1993. At the end of a 30 year war with Ethopia, which it had been given to by the US in return for summat or other in the best interests of the US. A volunteer teacher arrives from England. I knew less than jack shit about the history of Eritrea, although I did know where it was cos there's a Quaker charity at work there. Post-independence they asked for Aid. They then vetod the offers if they were linked to industry or defence contracts, prospecting for oil or gold, those initiatives t [...]


    • Instead of calling this work Ciao Asmara it should been titled either Ciao Keren, or Ciao Eritrea. Keren is the town where the author spent two years as a British volunteer teacher. There is nothing in this book about Asmara, and no mention of the capital city about which I was interested. Otherwise, this is yet another non-fiction attempt (marketed as fiction, probably) to explain Eritrea and the horrible, near continuous conflicts with Ethiopia that racked it for year after year as seen throug [...]


    • I noticed this book by chance on a library shelf while searching specifically for something else; it looked interesting, so I got it out as well. Pretty comprehensive look at post-independence Eritrea at a grasp-able level, including photos. Would make a great book to take along while traveling, etc.


    • This book was a little one sided but knowing zilch about Eritrea I found It accessible and most helpful. It made me worry when I was in Keren reflecting on his walk home, which I can confirm is often strange in Eritrea due to frequent power failures! Worth a shout if looking for a cultural travel book opposed to anything in depth.


    • An interesting account of the author's time as an English teacher in Eretria. The book's not just a personal account, however. It's also a history of Eretria's conflict with neighbouring Ethiopia - quite a potted history, admittedly, but very readable and deeply horrifying. I finished this book even more convinced than usual of my general ignorance; I'd no idea at all of what had happened there.


    • Written by a Brit who worked as a schoolteacher in Eritrea. Mostly consists of vignettes describing people he encountered, with just enough history to give context - kind of an impressionistic record of his experiences.




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