Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics

Noir A Collection of Crime Comics The biggest names in comics crime fiction assemble here for an anthology of original tales of murder and deceit presented in black and white Aided and abetted by some of the most gifted slatherers of

  • Title: Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics
  • Author: Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá
  • ISBN: 9781595823588
  • Page: 193
  • Format: Paperback
  • The biggest names in comics crime fiction assemble here for an anthology of original tales of murder and deceit, presented in black and white Aided and abetted by some of the most gifted slatherers of thick, black India ink in the field, this gang is headed straight for the bad parts of town, and you re invited along for the ride

    • ↠ Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics || ↠ PDF Read by Í Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá
      193 Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics || ↠ PDF Read by Í Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá
      Posted by:Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá
      Published :2019-02-06T08:45:18+00:00

    About “Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá

    • Brian Azzarello Diana Schutz Ed Brubaker Alex de Campi Eduardo Barreto Rick Geary Fábio Moon Gabriel Bá

      Brian Azzarello born in Cleveland, Ohio is an American comic book writer He came to prominence with 100 Bullets, published by DC Comics mature audience imprint Vertigo He and Argentine artist Eduardo Risso, with whom Azzarello first worked on Jonny Double, won the 2001 Eisner Award for Best Serialized Story for 100 Bullets 15 18 Hang Up on the Hang Low.Azzarello has written for Batman Broken City , art by Risso Batman Deathblow After the Fire , art by Lee Bermejo, Tim Bradstreet, Mick Gray and Superman For Tomorrow , art by Jim Lee.In 2005, Azzarello began a new creator owned series, the western Loveless, with artist Marcelo Frusin.As of 2007, Azzarello is married to fellow comic book writer and illustrator Jill Thompsonformation taken from enpedia wiki Brian_Az

    383 thoughts on “Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics

    • This is an anthology of crime comics by some of the best writers and artists working in the comics field today. Like most anthologies it's got some good stories and some poor ones but I think it's a pretty decent roundup of crime noir and an enjoyable, if brief, read. "Stray Bullets" creator David Lapham contributes the story of a kidnapped girl stuffed into a box "to be raped later" by a couple of teenage nutcases, only it ends with the boys being tricked by the girl and their own stupidity. Je [...]


    • I had hoped for more with this collectionI'm a big fan of classic noir and at first glance, this looked impressive. Unfortunately, it didn't quite meet my expectations. This is not to say that some of the stories aren't good--there are a few that I really liked. However, as a collection, I think it fell short. Some of the stories are just too predictable, and some don't quite meet the characteristics of "classic noir." The artwork is varied, lending itself to story in some selections, and taking [...]


    • Like pretty much any anthology, this one's a mixed bag, but it's mostly pretty good. I picked it up for the Gabriel Bá/Fabio Moon/Brian Azzarello story, which was pretty great, though I wonder how it'd play to someone unfamiliar with the mythology of Batman (if there is such a person).


    • Probably a 2.5 rating, but I always round up. The artwork was closer to the feeling of noir than the writing in most of these. You could see the endings to most of these stories coming a mile away. In a sense a lot of these felt more "Tales from the Crypt" than noir.



    • I read only the first four stories in this collection. The first story is ridiculous, the second story is uninteresting, and the third and fourth stories are confusing.



    • Pleasantly surprised; I was coming to this with expectations of both quality and convention. Quality was met. Convention was met and exceeded.There are a three science fiction stories, and now that I think about it, that's not unheard of; consider the Great Whatsit from Kiss Me Deadly. A similar (not identical!) story could have been told without the gadget in question in each case, but they worked well and even when I wasn't surprised by the ending (which is not a reflection on the story; just, [...]


    • I wasn't sure what to expect when I first began reading this collection of graphic short stories. There are thirteen stories in all, each of them dark and gritty. And I loved just about every one. The first story left me stunned. The second, about a man with an ill wife who is about to lose his farm, is probably my favorite. It was called "The Silo" and was written and drawn by Jeff Lemire. Another one of my favorites was called "The Albanian" by M.K. Perker about an immigrant janitor who stumbl [...]


    • Noir: A Collection of Crime Comics is a very thin volume of short crime stories, written by a variety of authors, well known and less well known. As with many anthologies, the results here are a mixed bag. While several of the tales here are pretty traditional pulp stories, most of them add some kind of spin to the genre, for better or worse. Unfortunately, in too many of these tales, the twists and tropes are very easily spotted. A number of the stories contained within have a strong science-fi [...]


    • This graphic novel is really great. It's collection of short stories about different types of crimes. Some of the stories are really interesting while some are just decent or okay. This book has some big names contributors too. Ed Brubaker, Brian Azzarello,Jeff Lemire, and Paul Grist to name a few. Brubaker bring his Criminal series to the collection with a 21th century tale. A tale that fits really well with his other Criminal comics. This story is a must read. Azzarello tells an interesting ta [...]


    • The best thing about this collection is the illustrations. The thing about comics/graphic novels, or any books that rely heavily on art is that even if the writing isn't that good, they're fun to look at. This applies to the Noir collection of crime comics. The stories are so short there's really no point in hoping for much. I love short stories, since they're the pivotal proving ground of all writers, as well as the means for a writer to be both prolific in ideas and to flex the entirety of the [...]


    • This is a wonderful collection of short Noir crime type stories by various authors and illustrators. Some are better than others but all succeed in creating that noir "mood". All of the stories have that sinister, yet cocky, mysterious and somehow abrupt, smoky, slow feeling that is essential in anything claiming to be Noir. Even the titles stayed true to the genre "The Albanian," "The Last HIt," "Ladies Choice". And the art was supurbme of it would normally not appeal to me, but it all fit with [...]


    • I found this a mixed bag of stories with some good some bad. Most seemed to prefer the twist/shock ending where you think you have everything figured out until The art styles vary widely. Most favor either what I think of as more indie art style or the more realistic style. Hugo Petreus' art really stuck out in a bad way for me. I really liked "21st Century Noir", Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips' Criminal story and "Trustworthy" by Ken Lizzi and Joelle Jones. What surprised me was how I much I l [...]


    • Over a dozen 6-10 page stories in here, all in beautiful black and white (even the Brubaker/Phillips "Criminal" tale, which Marvel usually publishes in color) and not a dud among them. Some have a science-fiction slant, like Dean Motter's "Mr. X" tale, but most are just straight-ahead good crime. I am kind of surprised that DC's legal department hasn't had words with Dark Horse over the Azzerello/Ba/Moon tale which ends the book, but it's good enough that I'm glad they got away with it. The high [...]


    • Like most collections of stories, this is a hit-and-miss batch. The first and last stories are clearly the standouts, and the worst sin of the least among them is mere confusion. There are some interesting experiments here, along with a few tired deadweights.The art varies, of course, but in general it's solid. It's all black-and-white, with (naturally) heavy on the black. Still, the artists tend to avoid the trap of overdoing it with the grim imagery. (They generally let the story do the shadin [...]


    • I like a lot of these artists and writers. I also love Noir. However, I was not into this book. It was mostly a chore for me to read. Most of it was just obsessed with the Noir twist, than with good artwork or writing. I liked the Jeff Lemire piece. That was the most surprising as it used his meditative, quiet style and gave it a dark, violent, subtle twist. I was also a fan of the Fillbach brothers Wim Wenders-esque story. And the final gag-oriented story, The Bad Night. Those are the stories t [...]


    • Some really good stuff from some names you'll know and some you won't. Ken Lizzi, M.K. Perker, Alex De Campi, Chris Offut, and Dean Motter's contributions were my favorites with Motter's and De Campi's stories really standing out. Motter giving a succinct but intriguiging glimpse into Mister X (definitely gonna take a look at this now; I especially appreciated the R.U.R shoutout). De Campi, mixing up reality and imagination and neuroses to paint a convincing portrait of psychological pain, madne [...]


    • Very little "NOIR" in here, might have been less of a letdown if The Publisher had used more brain cells to title it appropriately. A mixed bag of several genres. Honestly a few of the stories had very confusing "payoffs" in that i am not sure what happened exactly. Re-reads made the convoluted story-telling no less clearer. If you can look past the bad execution by a few of the creators (the "Batman Origin" re-spin being borderline insulting), there are still worthwhile mini-epics from Dave Lap [...]


    • This was a nice anthology of graphic crime fiction from some of yesterday's and today's authors. I recognized most of the names in this collection, even if I don't regularly collect their comics or read their fiction. Every voice was unique, strong and gritty. I especially liked the first and last two stories. The Box story really blew me away.I have been meaning to pick up more of the the crime comics that are out there (Criminal, 100 Bullets, etc.). This little appetizer might be just want I n [...]


    • The first and the final entries of this graphic novel compilation were the best. While there were a few good ones in between, I was disappointed that many seemed to be beginning on the final page of their stories. Overall, for just an hour or so's reading, there's a lot of great hard-boiled style, little twists, and nice artwork. A nice way to spend time waiting for your significant other to wake up on Thanksgiving morning.


    • Half are great and half are weak with obvious plots, tissue thin characters, and passable artwork. It seemed like a lot of the writers thought it was noir just to write about crime and put in a twist, but noir is really a mood and an evocation, not just shadowy panels and dames with obscure motives. Many feel like snippets of a bigger whole but the few pieces that sing really go to town. Lime I said about six or so on here that really get what noir means.


    • Definitely for adults.The first story by David Lapham was sick, but well told and illustrated.The Ancient Silo by Jeff Lemire was a good tale about an old farmer, his sick wife and their financial difficulties.The Last Hit written by Chris Offut and Illustrated by Kano and Stefano Gaudino was also well done, a hit man can never just walk away.Others I really liked were The New me by Gary Phillips, illustrated by Edward Barreto and Criminal: 21st Century Noir by Ed Bruba


    • An exciting collection of stories! I really enjoy noir stories. Although dark in nature, I enjoy the plot and the twists thoroughly. However, there was one story I didn't understand by the fillbach brothers but other than that, it was a thrilling read. The last story alludes to the beginnings of batman if I am not mistaken


    • A collection of noir short stories. However, the best of the stories were just okay, while the majority were either puzzling or pointless. Even the stories by otherwise reliable authors (such as Ed Brubaker) were disappointing.


    • A bit disappointing, especially w/ the Criminal story from Brubaker which was what I was looking forward to the most. I wouldn't even consider that story "noir". The Jeff Lemire story was fantastic, the prose piece with Joelle was great as well.


    • A mixed bag. Apparently someone told the authors they had all had to have a twist in their stories, with quite a few of them feeling rather arbitrary. There's some good stuff in here, particularly the first and last stories, but they are all so short that they barely have time to get started.


    • All collections like these will have their ups and downs, but overall these dark and amusing crime stories are pretty wonderful. Brian Azzarello, Jeff Lemire and Ed Brubaker all make some pitch perfect short noir stories.


    • Pretty good graphic novel about crime. I like the quote at the beginning of the book that statey crime is a fact of the human species a fact of that species alone. Some of the crimes are horrible and some individuals get what they deserve.


    • This is a great lil collection. My only complaint is that it's very short. The stories are short and there aren't many of them. It's a very quick read. It's a nice mini-intro to some big names if you're unfamiliar with their work.


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