Ghosts

Ghosts Ghosts opens with a shipwreck leaving a party of sightseers temporarily marooned on an island The stranded castaways make their way towards the refuge of the isle s reclusive savant but the big isola

  • Title: Ghosts
  • Author: John Banville
  • ISBN: 9780330371858
  • Page: 169
  • Format: Paperback
  • Ghosts opens with a shipwreck, leaving a party of sightseers temporarily marooned on an island The stranded castaways make their way towards the refuge of the isle s reclusive savant but the big isolated house which is home to Professor Silas Kreutznaer and his laconic assistant, Licht, is also home to another, unnamed presence .Onto this seemingly haunted island, whGhosts opens with a shipwreck, leaving a party of sightseers temporarily marooned on an island The stranded castaways make their way towards the refuge of the isle s reclusive savant but the big isolated house which is home to Professor Silas Kreutznaer and his laconic assistant, Licht, is also home to another, unnamed presence .Onto this seemingly haunted island, where a strange singing hangs in the air, Banville drops a scrumptious cast of characters including a murderer and weaves a tale where the details are clear but the conclusion polymorphous shifting appearances, transformations and thwarted assumptions make this world of uneasy calm utterly enthralling.

    Ghosts BBC Sitcom British Comedy Guide The crumbling country pile of Button House is home to numerous restless spirits who have died there over the centuries each ghost very much a product of their time, resigned to squabbling with each other for eternity over the most inane of daily gripes. Ghosts The latest news, photos, pictures and videos Mirror Do ghosts exist You can see for yourself with all the latest ghost news including sightings with pictures and videos The truth is out there BBC iPlayer Ghosts Ghosts A cash strapped young couple inherit a grand country house, only to find it is both falling apart and teeming with the ghosts of former inhabitants. Ghosts TV series Ghosts is a sitcom broadcast on BBC One about a collection of ghosts from different historical periods haunting a country house while sharing the house with its new living occupants. BBC One Ghosts A cash strapped young couple inherit a grand country house, only to find it is both falling apart and teeming with the ghosts of former inhabitants.

    • ✓ Ghosts || ✓ PDF Download by ☆ John Banville
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      Published :2019-06-24T09:36:55+00:00

    About “John Banville

    • John Banville

      Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland His father worked in a garage and died when Banville was in his early thirties his mother was a housewife He is the youngest of three siblings his older brother Vincent is also a novelist and has written under the name Vincent Lawrence as well as his own His sister Vonnie Banville Evans has written both a children s novel and a reminiscence of growing up in Wexford.Educated at a Christian Brothers school and at St Peter s College in Wexford Despite having intended to be a painter and an architect he did not attend university Banville has described this as A great mistake I should have gone I regret not taking that four years of getting drunk and falling in love But I wanted to get away from my family I wanted to be free After school he worked as a clerk at Aer Lingus which allowed him to travel at deeply discounted rates He took advantage of this to travel in Greece and Italy He lived in the United States during 1968 and 1969 On his return to Ireland he became a sub editor at the Irish Press, rising eventually to the position of chief sub editor His first book, Long Lankin, was published in 1970.After the Irish Press collapsed in 1995, he became a sub editor at the Irish Times He was appointed literary editor in 1998 The Irish Times, too, suffered severe financial problems, and Banville was offered the choice of taking a redundancy package or working as a features department sub editor He left Banville has been a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1990 In 1984, he was elected to Aosd na, but resigned in 2001, so that some other artist might be allowed to receive the cnuas.Banville also writes under the pen name Benjamin Black His first novel under this pen name was Christine Falls, which was followed by The Silver Swan in 2007 Banville has two adult sons with his wife, the American textile artist Janet Dunham They met during his visit to San Francisco in 1968 where she was a student at the University of California, Berkeley Dunham described him during the writing process as being like a murderer who s just come back from a particularly bloody killing Banville has two daughters from his relationship with Patricia Quinn, former head of the Arts Council of Ireland.Banville has a strong interest in vivisection and animal rights, and is often featured in Irish media speaking out against vivisection in Irish university research.

    723 thoughts on “Ghosts

    • Everything in this world resembles something else so Ghosts vaguely echoes The Tempest by William Shakespeare. And the island is something between Aeaea – Circe’s home isle, and the Land of Nod – the place of Cain’s exile.Extraordinary the look of things at dusk then, it might have been another planet, with that pale vault of sky, those crouched and hesitant, dreamy distances. I wandered about the house, going softly through the stillness and shadows, and sometimes I would lose myself, I [...]


    • Some people are ghosts, even when they are alive. This is what makes this a horror story; people. When it is the usual stream of consciousness fare that it is. Who writes more beautiful prose than Banville? Absolutely no one.This isn't actually a ghost story, of course. But if you love rare words and unique writing, and Ireland as I do, then this is the book for you, as it was for me.


    • here is the thing about banville. about the perfection of his prose. you can be 38 pages into this book and read "I too was eager already for change, for disorder, for the mess and confusion that people make of thingsCompany, that was what we wanted, the brute warmth of the presence of others to tell us we were alive after all, despite appearances" and you will close the book and run your hand over the cover and stare off into the distance at a tree. the way the light hits it in a square, illumi [...]


    • Ratings (1 to 5)Writing: 4Plot: 2Characters: 2Emotional impact: 2Overall rating: 2.5NotesFavorite character(s):Favorite quotes: "e wind of something that was almost happiness wafted through them all." p.7"He had a disjointed, improvised air, as if he had been put together in haste from disparate bits and pieces of other people." p.12"fear always holds at its throbbing centre that little, thin, unquenchable flame of pleasure." p.114Other notes: I was really impressed by this book initially. I lov [...]


    • Confusingly, This guy gets a lot of grief on here for being pretentious. But, to me it is an authentic pretentiousness, like art is. Very unlike David Foster Wallace who tries to sound cooler than you or Michael Chabon who tries to sound smarter (and who prolly are.).


    • L'isola è il mio elemento naturale, un mondo a sé, in cui tutto acquista un valore diverso, forse per via dell'acqua che fa da confine e da limite allo stesso tempo. Anche la luce e il cielo ne sono condizionati, e di conseguenza il modo in cui vediamo gli oggetti e percepiamo il tempo.L'isola di Banville è un luogo aspro, quasi dimenticato, a cui si approda volontariamente per sfuggire al passato, cambiare vita, cancellare ricordi, nascondersi. Ma ci si approda anche per caso, come accade ai [...]


    • Un amico mi ha fatto notare un mio limite nello scrivere i commenti ai libri che leggo, consistente nel fatto che quando scrivo un commento positivo mi dilungo e sono prolissa, al contrario quando scrivo che un libro non mi è piaciuto sono concisa, troppo breve.Ha ragione.Quando un libro mi è piaciuto mi perdo nel commento quasi con voluttà, come per prolungare il piacere che ho provato nella lettura; quando non mi è piaciuto sono sbrigativa, quasi per spicciarmi a toglierlo dalla mente, “ [...]


    • On some level I guess I get the complaint that Ghosts doesn't really have a plot and that it sets up a premise and then mostly ignores it, though I think that's missing the point. For one, it seems pretty clear that most of the plot points will be picked up in the next book (Athena), but more importantly it's a book that isn't really terribly concerned with plot anyway. Like Nabokov's Glory or The Gift (there I go comparing Banville to N again), it's a slow meditation, and the enjoyment comes fr [...]


    • A very intriguing, beautifully written novel, but not what I ever thought I'd like. There's no plot, it's rambling, emotionally diffuse and self-indulgent . . . so why did I like it so well that I'm going to start the sequel, Athena, immediately? The wit, wrenching self-exploration, and poetical expression of the narrator, Freddie Montgomery, are enormously affecting, both aesthetically and empathetically.In The Book of Evidence, Freddie committed murder, and Ghosts can be likened to Crime and P [...]



    • One doesn't read Banville for stories but prose. There is little story here, but there is rich prose.To wit:And so, quite empty, weightless as a paper skiff, I make my voyage out, far, far out, to the very brim, where a disc of water shimmers like molten coin against a coin-colored sky, and everything lifts, and sky and waters merge invisibly. (p. 20)andThe professor stood and listened to the unsteady beating of his heart, thinking how fear always holds at its throbbing centre that little, thin, [...]


    • Banville's command of language is second to none, but he's put his talents to work on far greater novels than this. It's a slight, slightly experimental sour-dream of a novel; a brief flirtation with conscience and consciousness is all that occurs before the reader is left adrift as adrift as the protagonists. A huge cast of characters are thrown at you, Dickensian stereotypes lurk in the corners, but there's never the effort shown to breathe life into any of them, and the lack of resolution (or [...]


    • I have no idea what this book is about. It may be about the construction of self, death, alienation or the imagination. The writing though is undoubtedly tremendous. I remember reading someone describing Austen's writing and saying it was impossible to point to one specific moment of genius. It seems so here too. I can't remember the last time I read anything quite so otherworldly, disorienting or troubling, as though there was a stream of some imminent catastrophe bubbling calmly beneath everyt [...]


    • I hate it when books build an interesting premise and then don't deliver. The mystery isn't solved, the grisly details of the narrator are not revealed. And there is much ponc-y art talk to add to my annoyance. I got the definite impression this was written by a pretensious git.



    • A beautifully written, meditative, intriguing novel about convicted criminal, Freddie Montgomery's thoughts and how he is coming to terms with himself, now that he is out of prison and living in a large house on an island with the owner and an old painting provenance expert, Professor Kreutnaer. There are other minor characters introduced that are not developed. The Book of Evidence is a good place to start reading Banville and should be read prior to reading Ghosts.If you haven't read any Banvi [...]


    • Look, it's all very clever and all, and Mr. Banville is an excellent writer, but, I just have to face the fact that I am not a fan of literary fiction. Damn it, I keep trying and failing. Here's another book I just fought with night after night. After 40 pages, I lost the gist of what was going on, and really, the story didn't grab me enough to keep going.


    • "È così che penso a me stesso, nell'atto di mangiarmi vivo" Banville e la sua potenza descrittiva a cinque sensi



    • I thought that even if "Ghosts" is part of a trilogy, it would not matter too much if I didn't read the first novel in the series. But I was wrong. When I was about 2/3 into the novel, barely understanding something out of what I have read until then, I decided to check out a synopsis of "The Book of Evidence". Only until then I could understand a little bit more what I was reading. Still this did not helped me like the book much more, as I couldn't get past the lack of plot.The premise is very [...]


    • Reviewers and critics and even the book's jacket talk of the menace and unsettling dread of Banville's "Ghosts." The patience of the story's dystopian landscape, the absorbancy of the narrator's compound eyes, the oddly limited prescience of the main character's mind -- they all do lend the tale a touch of the tragic, a hint of horror, a whisper of wickedness.But (much like the birds in this book, which wheel and whoop and sometimes thud into invisible panes of glass) those disconcerting element [...]



    • Well-written, as Banville's books usually are, but the narrator/main character doesn't want anything or believe anything, so he gets into deep trouble. Though an admirable writer, Banville seems to have an affinity for the perverse, a trait that won't win every reader.


    • Freddy Montgomery, the Nabokovian killer from Banville's comic riot of a novel, The Book of Evidence, has been released after just ten years of incarceration, for "exemplary" behaviour. He is living out the first weeks of his probated freedom on a rocky Irish island as an assistant to a professor compiling a study about an obscure (and fictional) painter.Soon after his arrival some unexpected visitors are ship-wrecked near their house, all of whom seem to mirror characters from the painter's mas [...]


    • When I embarked on my yearlong venture of UK living I thought, hey Critiqueen, let’s culturally assimilate. Thus, I bought Ghosts by John Banville, an Irish author who earned my respect by being profiled in the sacred pages of the New Yorker. Banville is an interesting case because he also publishes under another name, Benjamin Black. While Banville is the winner of the Man Booker Prize for his novel The Sea, Black can be found in the genre fiction section, crime fiction to be specific. Genre [...]


    • QUOTES:"Non sono mai stato il tipo che venera la natura, eppure riconosco un certo valore terapeutico alla contemplazione dei fenomeni naturali; credo che abbia a che fare con l'indifferenza del mondo, voglio dire con il modo in cui il mondo non si interessa a noi, alla nostra felicita' o a come soffriamo, con il modo in cui si limita ad aspettare guardando in alto, borbottando tra se' in una lingua che noi non capiamo mai." (page 71)"Quello che la interessava era la stessa cosa, che interessava [...]


    • On some level I guess I get the complaint that Ghosts doesn't really have a plot and that it sets up a premise and then mostly ignores it, though I think that's missing the point. For one, it seems pretty clear that most of the plot points will be picked up in the next book (Athena), but more importantly it's a book that isn't really terribly concerned with plot anyway. Like Nabokov's Glory or The Gift (there I go comparing Banville to N again), it's a slow meditation, and the enjoyment comes fr [...]


    • There are books you get because they tell a story and there are books you get because they are the embodiment of the art of writing. This book is one of the latter, which is probably why I floundered with it so much, because at the time I picked it up I was in the mood for story over art. There was no plot here, which doesn't bother me at all, because I enjoyed the way everything was written, but for some reason I just struggled to become involved in the book until the very end. Like some who ha [...]


    • you can accuse me of ignorance if you like. I can admit it. I have NO idea what this book was about. however I loved its lyricism, its evocation and philosophical insights.


    • I find reading John Banville uplifting and dispiriting in roughly equal measure: uplifting because every page features at least one sentence so exquisite as to induce laughter, wincing or some other physical reaction; dispiriting because anything else read or written for several days afterwards appears embarrassingly inadequate by comparison. There are one or two similes that feel ever so slightly contrived but these stand out because the rest of it is so outstanding. Banville generally gets awa [...]


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