The Sorrow Stone

The Sorrow Stone During the middle ages a peasant s superstition held that a mother mourning the death of her child could sell her sorrow by selling a nail from her child s coffin to a peddler Would you pay someone t

  • Title: The Sorrow Stone
  • Author: J.A. McLachlan
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 359
  • Format: ebook
  • During the middle ages, a peasant s superstition held that a mother mourning the death of her child could sell her sorrow by selling a nail from her child s coffin to a peddler Would you pay someone to bear your sorrow Lady Celeste is overwhelmed with grief when her infant son dies Desperate to find relief, she begs a passing peddler to buy her sorrow Jean, the cynicDuring the middle ages, a peasant s superstition held that a mother mourning the death of her child could sell her sorrow by selling a nail from her child s coffin to a peddler Would you pay someone to bear your sorrow Lady Celeste is overwhelmed with grief when her infant son dies Desperate to find relief, she begs a passing peddler to buy her sorrow Jean, the cynical peddler she meets, is nobody s fool he does not believe in superstitions and insists Celeste include the valuable ruby ring on her finger along with the nail in return for his coin Jean and Celeste both find themselves changed by their transaction in ways neither of them anticipated Jean finds that bearing another s sorrow opens him to strange fits of compassion, a trait he can ill afford Meanwhile Celeste learns that without her wedding ring her husband may set her aside, leaving her ruined She determines to retrieve it before he finds out without reclaiming her sorrow But how will she find the peddler and convince him to give up the precious ruby ring If you like realistic medieval fiction with evocative prose, compelling characters and a unique story, you ll love this incredible, introspective journey into the south of France in the 12th Century, based on an actual medieval belief Winner of the Royal Palm Literary Award for Historical Fiction J A McLachlan is a terrific writer wry and witty, with a keen eye for detail author Robert J Sawyer Strong, character driven fiction McLachlan makes you both care and think You can t ask for author Tanya Huff

    The Sorrow Stone A Medieval Historical Oct , The Sorrow Stone is a well crafted tale of class, station and s, and of their impermanence It is well researched and apparently true to its settings The characters, especially the lady, her maid, and the peddler are believable and at times sympathetic characters. The Sorrow Stone by J.A McLachlan Oct , The Sorrow Stone has as its premise, a little known superstition surrounding the sorrow of losing a child The story is narrated from the point of view of the main character who is suffering from traumatic amnesia. The Sorrow Stone J A McLachlan Oct , The Sorrow Stone is a well crafted tale of class, station and s, and of their impermanence It is well researched and apparently true to its settings The characters, especially the lady, her maid, and the peddler are believable and at times sympathetic characters. The Sorrow Stone A collection of poetry based on grief The Sorrow Stone is a poignant look into loss and grief from a poet s point of view Each poem is representative of the writer s journey as a Greif walker on the stage of life The collection of poems speaks of a unique approach to dealing or struggling through sorrow The cover represents the seeming randomness of life through chess. The Sorrow Stone A Journey Through Loss, Grief, and The Sorrow Stone A Journey Through Loss, Grief, and Healing out of based on ratings reviews. Sorrowstone Dragon s Dogma Wiki Fandom Description A stone that whistles forlornly in the wind A mineral that becomes less rare the further one travels from Gran Soren it can be mined from Ore deposits in the Barta Crags, Catacombs, Pastona Cavern, The Tainted Mountain Temple, Soulflayer Canyon or Northface Forest.

    • [PDF] À Free Read ↠ The Sorrow Stone : by J.A. McLachlan ↠
      359 J.A. McLachlan
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      Posted by:J.A. McLachlan
      Published :2019-01-13T15:58:52+00:00

    About “J.A. McLachlan

    • J.A. McLachlan

      J A McLachlan is a multi genre Canadian author She has seven published books a short story collection, CONNECTIONS Pandora Press two College texts on Professional Ethics Pearson Prentice Hall a science fiction novel, Walls of Wind self published two young adult fiction novels, The Occasional Diamond Thief and The Salarian Desert Game EDGE SFF Publishing and her first historical fiction novel, The Sorrow Stone Visit her website to learn and read excerpts from her books janeannmclachlanPraise for Walls of Wind Look out, C J Cherryh Step aside, Hal Clement There s a new master of truly alien SF, and her name is J A McLachlan THE WALLS OF WIND is doubtless THE debut novel of the year Robert J Sawyer, Hugo Award winning science fiction authorTamora Pierce read Occasional Diamond Thief and The Salarian Desert Game and said Tense, thrilling, edge of the seat reading I tore through this Kia and Agatha are a fascinating pair, Kia so practical, down to earth, and wilful Agatha so mystical and driven More, please Tamora Pierce

    306 thoughts on “The Sorrow Stone

    • The Story Behind the Story.This book has been years in the making. I first heard the medieval myth/superstition that it's based on at a talk by a midwife. She had researched historical birth practices and came across this: a woman grieving the death of her infant could relieve her sorrow by selling a nail from the child's coffin to a traveling peddler. This bit of folklore fascinated me. I wondered, what would happen if it worked? Even if the effect was purely psychological, because they believe [...]


    • Celeste lost a baby and grieved so much that she was not eating. Her husband took her to an abbey till she got well. She sold a nail from the baby's coffin to a peddler, she sold her sorrow. The peddler gave her a coin for the nail but also wanted her ruby and gold ring, that she had on her finger. There are a lot of things going on in this story. The characters are life like and complicated, but aren't we all. The descriptions are very good and add to the tale. It did get a little slow towards [...]


    • It took me a bit to become aware of McLachlan’s greatest strength. She is a master at creating and developing tortured characters. Character development is always an important element for me as a reader, and this story has it in spades. This is historical fiction and the author has taken great pains to portray twelfth century France as it really was, full of superstition, poverty and control via corrupt church dogma. That said, it is also populated by characters that offer solace and comfort, [...]


    • This is a fascinating story about superstition in medieval times and how this affected people's lives. The author did a good job of letting us know her characters by their actions rather than just 'telling' us what they were like.This book featured lean, tight writing with the perfect amount of character and setting descriptions. The writer paints a clear picture of the people and places without being verbose. The characters were expertly layered.


    • The premise of this book is based on an old superstition that a grieving mother could sell a nail from her deceased child's coffin to a peddler and that person would take their sorrow from them. There are two main characters, Jean and Lady Celeste. The two meet by chance outside the abbey where Celeste has been staying, grieving the death of her son Etienne. Celeste is in the street when Jean passes her on his way to sell his wares. She begs him to take the nail in her and and buy her sorrow. He [...]


    • I am shocked that this tale could be prolonged to over 300 pages. An interesting and unique plot but it was stretched by too much inflection of the main characters and very little action to propel it forward. I thought that, based on the description, there would have been more folklore. By the time I discovered it was repetitive it was too late and I finished the novel despite feeling I was reading the same 10 pages over and over. Celeste is destroyed by the death of her son. Begging a spice tra [...]


    • I really enjoyed this historical novel with its unique premise of someone buying another's sorrow. Although I’m not familiar with the medieval time period, the book felt authentic and featured a lot of intricate descriptions and historical speech.The book switches in between two characters’ perspectives, Lady Celeste and peddler Jean. I love how we get a full picture of their flaws and details about their different stations in life. There were, though, a few changes in perspective that threw [...]


    • Once I started reading this book I became so immersed in it I was unable to stop thinking about it during the times I had to put it down. I felt the protagonist's sorrow very deeply. At first she remembered very little about what had happened to cause her sorrow. It was only after she sold her bent nail, supposedly from her child's coffin, and inadvertently her wedding ring also to a passing peddler, she was able to slowly remember bits and pieces at a time about what had happened to cause her s [...]


    • WOW! This is the best book I've read this year. Superbly written. Set in South of France during 12 Century it is the story of Lady Celeste and a peddler called Jean. The book gripped me from the beginning to the end. Fantastic writing.I'm almost stuck for words – good, superb, brilliant and many more adjectives in the same vein, to try and do this book justice.The story encompasses the time brilliantly, from barbaric acts to acts of kindness, from superstition to religion to heretics, the poor [...]


    • The story-line of the novel is a suitable background for a misty picture of medieval cruelty, superstition and unforgiving hardness of life with a dose of heartless intrigue and only a faint glimmer of compassionate action, sympathy, and charity. The story-line is at times unbelievably improbable, but it doesn't detract – perhaps even adds - to the clarity of the gloomy picture that's viewed mostly through the lens of ordinary people. The view through the lens of high society is largely missin [...]


    • Two strangers cross paths and it changes both of them. Narrative goes back and forth between each one as they struggle with the after effects of exchanging sorrow (in the symbol of a nail and ring) for a coin. It does bring up a valid question: without going through sorrow, without carrying it with us as part of our life, would we have compassion for the trials of others, or would we follow our own selfish needs and use strangers to advance our own causes?While the travels of each one can seem t [...]


    • I have not read any books by this author before. I was pleasantly surprised! This book is rich with detail from the time period which I really like. The author traveled in the area where this book takes place in France and did research to make sure this historical novel is authentically presented.The writing flows easily with various plot lines that intertwine. I like the viewpoints from the different characters which added depth to this novel. I felt like I was right there experiencing everythi [...]


    • Is it possible to sell your sorrow to another? When her young son dies Lady Celeste is weighed down with sorrow and guilt, tinged with a touch of madness and so she sells her wedding ring hoping to free herself from fear and bad dreams. Instead of the release she seeks her life is filled with lies and half truths as she plunges into one bad decision after another I found the story a bit confusing in the beginning. It would have been helpful if the author had noted the time and place beginning of [...]


    • This was a fascinating book , full of meticulous and interesting facts about medieval France. The picture painted was so vivid I felt as though I was there. The storyline followed Lady Celeste and Jean the peddler, the way in which their paths crossed and the consequences. I did feel it was a little slow at first but it gathered in pace as the story progressed. I was pleased to read that there will be further books about the characters. I received pre-release copy and have voluntarily reviewed i [...]


    • The lady celesteI really enjoyed this book I read it all in one day.I enjoyed how the characters came alive on the pages.I would get angry at Celeste while I read this storye author did a great job bringing the feelings of Celeste out of the pages.I would love to read more of her books


    • This is a well researched book that kept my interest in the story, it deals with superstition in a time that a lot could happen in southern part of France in the medieval period , also what grief caused this lady to do . I received a copy of this book and am voluntarily choosing to review it.


    • Great read! The author does a great job of describing the society and physical environment in Medieval France, so much so, I was able to picture everything clearly as I read. The storyline and characters were well-developed. I highly recommend it!


    • An amazing historical novel from the Middle Ages – the characters, story and everything is so well written as how it really would have been in Middle Ages --- you can’t help but be thankful for being here today in today’s World --- was extremely difficult to put down and made for fast reading!


    • Great readI was unaware of the superstition at the heart of this book, now I find myself intrigued and wondering if I, too, could sell some of my less positive emotions, and if it was possible, would I? A good story, well written, and makes one reflect on emotions


    • What a great read by a first time author for me. About superstition in the medieval times, interesting story and totally different style from what I usually read.


    • A fast read. Interesting enough to get me to the end. Well-written, but not quite the type and style of novel I truly enjoy.


    • Engrossing!!!!I loved this book. Very well written and the plot was great. made me want to find out what happened because i couldnt quite guess Good job.


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