Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust

Allegories of Reading Figural Language in Rousseau Nietzsche Rilke and Proust This important theoretical work by Paul de Man sets forth a mode of reading and interpretation based on exemplary texts by Rousseau Nietzsche Rilke and Proust The readings start from unresolved dif

  • Title: Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust
  • Author: Paul De Man
  • ISBN: 9780300028454
  • Page: 483
  • Format: Paperback
  • This important theoretical work by Paul de Man sets forth a mode of reading and interpretation based on exemplary texts by Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust The readings start from unresolved difficulties in the critical traditions engendered by these authors, and they return to the places in the text where those difficulties are most apparent or most incisively refThis important theoretical work by Paul de Man sets forth a mode of reading and interpretation based on exemplary texts by Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust The readings start from unresolved difficulties in the critical traditions engendered by these authors, and they return to the places in the text where those difficulties are most apparent or most incisively reflected upon The close reading leads to the elaboration of a general model of textual understanding, in which de Man shows that the thematic aspects of the texts their assertions of truth or falsehood as well as their assertions of values are linked to specific modes of figuration that can be identified and described The description of synchronic figures of substitution leads, by an inner logic embedded in the structure of all tropes, to extended, narrative figures or allegories De Man poses the question whether such self generating systems of figuration can account fully for the intricacies of meaning and of signification they produce Throughout the book, issues in contemporary criticism are addressed analytically rather than polemically Traditional oppositions are put in question by a rhetorical analysis which demonstrates why literary texts are such powerful sources of meaning yet epistemologically so unreliable Since the structure which underlies this tension belongs to language in general and is not confined to literary texts, the book, starting out as practical and historical criticism or as the demonstration of a theory of literary reading, leads into larger questions pertaining to the philosophy of language Through elaborate and elegant close readings of poems by Rilke, Proust s Remembrance, Nietzsche s philosophical writings and the major works of Rousseau, de Man concludes that all writing concerns itself with its own activity as language, and language, he says, is always unreliable, slippery, impossible.Literary narrative, because it must rely on language, tells the story of its own inability to tell a story.De Man demonstrates, beautifully and convincingly, that language turns back on itself, that rhetoric is untrustworthy Julia Epstein, Washington Post Book World The study follows out of the thinking of Nietzsche and Genette among others , yet moves in strikingly new directions.De Man s text, almost certain to be endlessly provocative, is worthy of repeated re reading Ralph Flores, Library Journal Paul de Man continues his work in the tradition of deconstructionist criticism, which begins with the observation that all language is constructed therefore the task of criticism is to deconstruct it and reveal what lies behind The title of his new work reflects de Man s preoccupation with the unreliability of language The contributions that the book makes, both in the initial theoretical chapters and in the detailed analyses or deconstructions of particular texts are undeniable Caroline D Eckhardt, World Literature Today

    • [PDF] Download ↠ Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust | by ☆ Paul De Man
      483 Paul De Man
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ↠ Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust | by ☆ Paul De Man
      Posted by:Paul De Man
      Published :2019-07-05T07:15:03+00:00

    About “Paul De Man

    • Paul De Man

      Paul de Man was a Belgian born deconstructionist literary critic and theorist.He began teaching at Bard College Later, he completed his Ph.D at Harvard University in the late 1950s He then taught at Cornell University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Zurich, before ending up on the faculty in French and Comparative Literature at Yale University, where he was considered part of the Yale School of deconstruction.At the time of his death from cancer, he was Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale After his death, the discovery of some two hundred articles he wrote during World War II for collaborationist newspapers, including one explicitly anti Semitic, caused a scandal and provoked a reconsideration of his life and work De Man oversaw the dissertations of both Gayatri Spivak and Barbara Johnson.

    841 thoughts on “Allegories of Reading: Figural Language in Rousseau, Nietzsche, Rilke, and Proust

    • Paul de Man is a master at literary analysis. Next to Derrida, he is the great intellectual figure of 1960s deconstructionism (part of "the Yale School"). However, unlike Derrida, his writing is accessible and unambiguous. Too many people dismiss deconstructive analysis for all the wrong reasons (wrong reasons being its association with a whole Derridean school of obscurantism - A. Ronell, G. Spivak, J. Butler, S. Weber, etc. etc.) Paul de Man, however, makes committments to clear writing and ac [...]


    • It is impossible to read with all the blinders off, but deconstructive theory suggests reading skeptically in an attempt not to smooth over the rough and contradictory spots in a text. For those who dislike Paul de Man, deconstructive theory suggests only the melancholic impossibility of any reading as well as the impossibility of ever representing the self in the text. To the contrary, de Man seeks to problematize and open up a text as fully as possible. If there is a key concept in de Man's me [...]


    • Paul De Man deploys his deconstructive method in readings of works by Proust, Rilke, Nietzsche and Rousseau. The book appears to be organized such that the farther one progresses in one's reading, the more complex De Man's discussion becomes. In the first section, De Man analyzes a number of passages from Proust's work, and comments on the rhetorical techniques that writer employs in his fiction. Following this, the section on Rilke is a little more complex not only because the works under discu [...]


    • Defining “rhetoric” as “the study of tropes and figures” (6), de Man considers the indissoluble figurations present in such authors as Rousseau and Nietzsche. He also considers Proust, examining how the reading practices of Swann’s Way’s protagonist intertwine with Proust’s writing and his reader’s reading and arguing that “[n]arrative is the metaphor of the moment, as reading is the metaphor of writing” (68). Reading becomes a process of encountering metaphors and metonymies [...]


    • This is a difficult book. Have a notebook, a pen, and a powerful search engine at hand before trying it.De Man makes impressive deconstructive maneuvers through the most innocuous task of just reading the text to see how it functions. The methodology goes something like this: Read a book. Great, now what does the text claim to mean (or argue for) at face value? Good, good. Now, if you look at ~the language that the author actually uses~ (I.E. metaphors, tropes, and other forms of figurative lang [...]



    • Tung tung tung, men lærerik om (det jeg nå ser på som selvfølgeligheter rundt) selvbiografier The Autobiography as De-facement





    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *