Forgotten English

Forgotten English Have you ever sent a message via scandaroon needed a nimgimmer or fallen victim to bowelhive Never heard of these terms That s because they are a thing of the past These words are alive and well ho

  • Title: Forgotten English
  • Author: Jeffrey Kacirk
  • ISBN: 9780688150181
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Have you ever sent a message via scandaroon, needed a nimgimmer, or fallen victim to bowelhive Never heard of these terms That s because they are a thing of the past These words are alive and well, however, in Forgotten English, a charming collection of hundreds of archaic words, their definitions, and old fashioned line drawings.For readers of Bill Bryson, Henry Beard,Have you ever sent a message via scandaroon, needed a nimgimmer, or fallen victim to bowelhive Never heard of these terms That s because they are a thing of the past These words are alive and well, however, in Forgotten English, a charming collection of hundreds of archaic words, their definitions, and old fashioned line drawings.For readers of Bill Bryson, Henry Beard, and Richard Lederer, Forgotten English is an eye opening trip down a delightful etymological path Readers learn that an ale connor sat in a puddle of ale to judge its quality, that a beemaster informed bees of any important household events, and that our ancestors had a saint for hangover sufferers, St Bibiana, a fact pertinent to the word bibulous Each selection is accompanied by literary excerpts demonstrating the word s usage, from sources such as Shakespeare, Dickens, Chaucer, and Benjamin Franklin Entertaining as well as educational, Forgotten English is a fascinating addition to word lovers books.

    • Best Read [Jeffrey Kacirk] Ý Forgotten English || [Music Book] PDF ☆
      395 Jeffrey Kacirk
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      Published :2020-01-03T10:03:22+00:00

    About “Jeffrey Kacirk

    • Jeffrey Kacirk

      Jeffrey Kacirk Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Forgotten English book, this is one of the most wanted Jeffrey Kacirk author readers around the world.

    652 thoughts on “Forgotten English

    • Forgotten English is a collection of antiquated words and their histories.When I saw this book, I was picturing a dictionary full of words that have fallen out of favor. While it is that, it's also a lot more.Forgotten English contains a lot of words, some seldom used, some probably never uttered aloud in several centuries, and a lot of fun facts pertaining to them. Did you know that a stirrup-cup, a mug of some alcoholic beverage handed to a horsed patron of a tavern as he leaves, is the origin [...]


    • At first, I took umbrage with the title of this little book. Forgotten English suggests we'd be treated to a dictionary of sorts, full of archaic English words, long since fallen out of favour. And yet, early on, we're told about buggery and succubi and gammon and ambergris and hobnails. Sure, I probably wouldn't use all of those words in polite conversation, and definitely not in the same sentence, but forgotten? Not really.I chalked this up to the book's American origins and figured it should [...]


    • Similar to the Superior Person’s Book of Words insofar as it attempts to recover and popularize cool words. Contains etymologies, quotations of usage, and other bits regarding ancient terms long fallen into desuetude. Recommended for astrologamages, rattoners, and fribblers.


    • The selection of "forgotten" English words featured were nicely amusing and strange, as were many of the superstitions and puzzling rituals behind them, but at least a quarter of them aren't really forgotten—at least to anyone who is reasonably well read. Unfortunately, quite a few of the quotes from long-dead authors had so little to do with the subject that they brought to mind a non-forgotten, non-English term, "non sequitur". Also, the illustrations looked like they might be topical and en [...]



    • I took my time reading this book and I'm glad I did, because it's a book that should be savoured in small doses. Forgotten English is a book about words that have fallen out of use. Some I actually knew/had heard about, some are the predecessors of modern words, and some flabbergasted me. The words are organised by theme, such as drink, occupation, love, etc and each word contains the meaning and a brief history of it.Most of the time, this history includes examples of how the word was used, wit [...]


    • Having read a considerable amount on the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, this book helped in interpreting some of the vocabulary used by the authors. Easy quick read.


    • FLITCHA side of various game animals, from as long ago as the early eighth century, and recently only applied to bacon. The phrase, "to bring home the bacon," developed during the fourteenth century in the Essex county town of Dunmow, England. Dunmow records show that a noblewoman attempted to encourage marital contentment by offering a gammon, or side of bacon called a dunmow flitch, to any couple who would swear that for the past year they had not had a household brawl or wished themselves unm [...]


    • Forgotten English: A Merry Guide to Antiquated Words, Packed with History, Fun Facts, Literary Excerpts, and Charming Drawings by Jeffrey Kacirk (Quill William Morrow 1997) (422.0) is an interesting read for those curious about the origins of common speech in the English language. A number of these words are still in use today if one knows where to look (e.g ambergris, scaramouch, pismire, hobnail, press-gang). My rating: 6/10, finished 11/21/11.


    • Some interesting details and anecdotes, but many of the words are hardly "forgotten" and, with some of the more outlandish entries, there's very little evidence given to suggest the terms were in common usage.


    • Entertaining. Kacirk explains how some of these "forgotten" words are actually still used to today in different permutations. It was a nice twist to be educated about language and laughing out loud at the same time. I recommend this book to anyone who loves the history of english.


    • Not as engaging as I had hoped for, yet interesting enough to finish. What did I learn from this? Well, now I know what "lant" is. Look it up.





    • Very good but let down by its US authorship, as some of the words "no longer used" are regularly used in the UK


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