The Pope's Bookbinder: A Memoir

The Pope s Bookbinder A Memoir Entertaining moving informative intelligently hopeful I know of few other books like this one to warm the cockles of a booklover s heart Alberto Manguel For anyone who loves books too wellwho lusts

  • Title: The Pope's Bookbinder: A Memoir
  • Author: David Mason
  • ISBN: 9781927428160
  • Page: 209
  • Format: ebook
  • Entertaining, moving, informative, intelligently hopeful I know of few other books like this one to warm the cockles of a booklover s heart Alberto Manguel For anyone who loves books too wellwho lusts after them, lives in them, mainlines themDavid Mason s memoir will be a fix from heaven Heartful, cantankerous, droll, his tales of honour and obsession in the trade graEntertaining, moving, informative, intelligently hopeful I know of few other books like this one to warm the cockles of a booklover s heart Alberto Manguel For anyone who loves books too wellwho lusts after them, lives in them, mainlines themDavid Mason s memoir will be a fix from heaven Heartful, cantankerous, droll, his tales of honour and obsession in the trade gratify the very book love they portray An irresistible read Dennis Lee An atmospheric, informative memoir by a Canadian seller of used and rare books Gossipy, rambling and enchanting, alive with Mason s love for books of every variety Kirkus Reviews From his drug hazy, book happy years near the Beat Hotel in Paris and throughout his career as antiquarian book dealer, David Mason brings us a storied life He discovers his love of literature in a bathtub at age eleven, thumbing through stacks of lurid Signet paperbacks At fifteen he s expelled from school For the next decade and a half, he will work odd jobs, buck all authority, buy books often than food, and float around Europe He ll help gild a volume in white morocco for Pope John XXIII And then, at the age of 30, after returning home to Canada and apprenticing with Joseph Patrick Books, David Mason will find his calling Over the course of what is now a legendary international career, Mason shows unerring instincts for the logic of the trade He makes good money from Canadian editions, both legitimate and pirated turns out Canadian piracies so incensed Mark Twain that he moved to Montreal for six months to gain copyright protection He outfoxes the cousins of L.M Montgomery at auction and blackmails the head of the Royal Ontario Museum He excoriates the bureaucratic pettiness that obstructs public acquisitions, he trumpets the ingenuity of collectors and scouts, and in archives around the world he appraises history in its unsifted and most moving forms Above all, however, David Mason boldly campaigns for what he feels is the moral duty of the antiquarian trade to preserve the history and traditions of all nations, and to assert without compromise that such histories have value Sly, sparkling, and endearingly gruff, The Pope s Bookbinder is an engrossing memoir by a giant in the book tradewhose infectious enthusiasm, human insight, commercial shrewdness, and deadpan humour will delight bibliophiles for decades to come.

    • Best Download [David Mason] ¿ The Pope's Bookbinder: A Memoir || [History Book] PDF ↠
      209 David Mason
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      Published :2019-04-09T00:24:59+00:00

    About “David Mason

    • David Mason

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    781 thoughts on “The Pope's Bookbinder: A Memoir

    • First, I should say that Biblioasis (the publisher) has been putting out really great books for several years now. Secondly, I should acknowledge that, like many other links in the great chain of reading, I wouldn't have got onto this great little treasure if I hadn't read "Bookshops - A Cultural History" by Jorge Carrion (and another Biblioasis book), who mentioned it in his book and made it sound as tantalizing as it is. David Mason is a lifelong reader and book person who, despite starting li [...]


    • After reading the Washington Post’s review of this book, I decided to get it from our local library. Flush with a gift card, I bought my own copy. I wish I had waited to get it from the library, and also wish that the library had lost it before I got to pick it up. I found that David Mason’s memoir had some very good advice and some fun stories, but these were outweighed by his arrogance, sexism and elitism. While reviewing my notes before writing this review, I felt a little bad at having g [...]


    • I happily closed this book with the feeling I'd learned something about a business I'd never thought about, or cared to know.While Mason sometimes comes off to me a bit self-righteous, his stories and anecdotes made me smile more than once. Again, he reminds me how sad it is that independent bookstores are closing rapidly, and even the giants must sell giftware, accessories and housewares to turn a profit.The writing could use a bit more polishing, and there is one instance in which he describes [...]



    • There has been plenty of times that a book lover has gone into a bookstore and wondered about the individual that is sitting behind the till. Is that person the owner of this wonderful location the owner or just a clerk? Is that person a fellow book lover or and cankerous individual out to make a buck? Is that person minding with trepidation what we are doing between their shelves or are they quietly welcoming the company to this magical realm? For those of us who spent time shopping for books i [...]


    • In spite of the title, the book is really the memoirs of a used (or antiquarian) bookseller, based in Toronto for many years. I read bookseller memoirs as a genre, and this one is pretty good. The author outlines his early life, making the reader wonder whether he will ever straighten himself out and become a bookseller, as promised on the jacket. It is interesting to see how a ne'er do well turned himself around and became a successful businessperson. He emphasizes how little he knew at the beg [...]


    • I gladly bought Mason's memoir from having read his immensely entertaining columns inCanadian Notes and Queries(many of which are reprinted or revised). While the transition to a full length work could have used some editing, especially as my interest waned by the end, it's a highly engaging and realistic look into the dramatic world of antiquarian bookselling in Canada. Don't let the jacket copy fool you, however - there's very limited mention of the Pope, drugs or William Burroughs. Rather, th [...]


    • Just finished reading a trade cloth version of the book, and once my review is live on citybookreview I will share it here. This book will make a fascinating, one-of-a-kind read for students of literature and book collection. Not only is it educating in and of itself, it is packed with fascinating stories of the antiquarian book trade and the bookselling underground. I gave it three stars because the writing was not as fully polished as I would have liked; this may have been because it was a pre [...]


    • Don’t be misled by the title: These aren’t the reflections of a devout Benedictine who has spent decades creating blind-stamped vellum missals for his Holiness. David Mason is, in fact, one of Canada’s most respected antiquar­ian booksellers. His absorbing memoir might be summed up by a button I recently acquired: “Life? Of course I have a life. It’s a life filled with books.”


    • Very interesting book with some wonderful and colourful anecdotes. Mason's passion for the bookselling trade and the profession of book collecting was palpable; unfortunately, I was also left with the impression (I hope it is false) that he was somewhat of a misogynist.


    • Lots of fun. Reveals many stories of life in the book trade in Toronto. Informative and useful for those "in the business".


    • only put this on my list after looking up the name of a guy who wrote a beautiful article about Australia.which I saw on FB. No urgency to read it but it may fit a reading challenge category?



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