Render to Caesar: Jesus, the Early Church, and the Roman Superpower

Render to Caesar Jesus the Early Church and the Roman Superpower At the end of the th century postcolonialism described the effort to understand the experience of those who had lived under colonial rule This kind of thinking has inevitably brought about a reexam

  • Title: Render to Caesar: Jesus, the Early Church, and the Roman Superpower
  • Author: Christopher Bryan
  • ISBN: 9780195183344
  • Page: 411
  • Format: Hardcover
  • At the end of the 20th century, postcolonialism described the effort to understand the experience of those who had lived under colonial rule This kind of thinking has inevitably brought about a reexamination of the rise of Christianity, which took place under Roman colonial rule How did Rome look from the viewpoint of an ordinary Galilean in the first century of the ChAt the end of the 20th century, postcolonialism described the effort to understand the experience of those who had lived under colonial rule This kind of thinking has inevitably brought about a reexamination of the rise of Christianity, which took place under Roman colonial rule How did Rome look from the viewpoint of an ordinary Galilean in the first century of the Christian era What should this mean for our own understanding of and relationship to Jesus of Nazareth In the past, Jesus was often depoliticized, treated as a religious teacher imparting timeless truths for all people Now, however, many scholars see Jesus as a political leader whose goal was independence from Roman rule so that the people could renew their traditional way of life under the rule of God In Render to Caesar, Christopher Bryan reexamines the attitude of the early Church toward imperial Rome Choosing a middle road, he asserts that Jesus and the early Christians did indeed have a critique of the Roman superpower a critique that was broadly in line with the entire biblical and prophetic tradition One cannot worship the biblical God, the God of Israel, he argues, and not be concerned about justice in the here and now On the other hand, the biblical tradition does not challenge human power structures by attempting to dismantle them or replace them with other power structures Instead, Jesus message consistently confronts such structures with the truth about their origin and purpose Their origin is that God permits them Their purpose is to promote God s peace and justice Power is understood as a gift from God, a gift that it is to be used to serve God s will and a gift that can be taken away by God when misused Render to Caesar transforms our understanding of early Christians and their relationship to Rome and demonstrates how Jesus teaching continues to challenge those who live under structures of government quite different from those that would have been envisaged by the authors of the New Testament.

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    • Christopher Bryan

      Christopher Bryan Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Render to Caesar: Jesus, the Early Church, and the Roman Superpower book, this is one of the most wanted Christopher Bryan author readers around the world.

    735 thoughts on “Render to Caesar: Jesus, the Early Church, and the Roman Superpower

    • A concise but effective treatment of the civic theology of the New Testament. Bryan critiques N T Wright and others who want to see Christianity as primarily a competitor to the political empires of the world and instead offers up a view where Christianity works by internal reforms and radical submission and gratitude.


    • Best lesson in this book - author's comment on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. working within the institutions (the Constitution) for his goal not tearing it apart. Parallel to Jesus Christ and Roman Empire was very interesting. The rest of the book is dry and overdone with Greek translations. Time would be better spent reading Edward Gibbon.


    • There are some issues I wish he would have tackled longer, and he has many liberal views about various matters, but he makes a lot of good points against postcolonial, pacifist, anti-imperial, "counter-polis", etc. perspectives on the political theology of scripture. Apart from the liberalism, this provides a historical-critical defense of a Reformational-two-kingdoms perspective.


    • A relatively unbiased and objective approach to how the figure of Jesus might have approached and engaged with the Roman Empire during his time. It is well-researched and Bryan argues his claims extremely well. For those who are interested in Christianity, Roman history, Jewish history, and academic scholarship in religious studies, this is a good book to read.


    • Excellent book that explores the nuances of our understanding of the relationship between Roman society and Jesus.


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