Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing

Shamanism Colonialism and the Wild Man A Study in Terror and Healing Working with the image of the Indian shaman as Wild Man Taussig reveals not the magic of the shaman but that of the politicizing fictions creating the effect of the real This extraordinary book will

  • Title: Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing
  • Author: Michael Taussig
  • ISBN: 9780226790138
  • Page: 463
  • Format: Paperback
  • Working with the image of the Indian shaman as Wild Man, Taussig reveals not the magic of the shaman but that of the politicizing fictions creating the effect of the real This extraordinary book will encourage ever critical and creative explorations Fernando Coronil, I American Journal of Sociology I Taussig has brought a formidable collection of data fromWorking with the image of the Indian shaman as Wild Man, Taussig reveals not the magic of the shaman but that of the politicizing fictions creating the effect of the real This extraordinary book will encourage ever critical and creative explorations Fernando Coronil, I American Journal of Sociology I Taussig has brought a formidable collection of data from arcane literary, journalistic, and biographical sources to bear on questions of evil, torture, and politically institutionalized hatred and terror His intent is laudable, and much of the book is brilliant, both in its discovery of how particular people perpetrated evil and others interpreted it Stehen G Bunker, Social Science Quarterly

    • ☆ Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Michael Taussig
      463 Michael Taussig
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      Posted by:Michael Taussig
      Published :2019-08-19T18:53:05+00:00

    About “Michael Taussig

    • Michael Taussig

      Michael Taussig born 1940 earned a medical degree from the University of Sydney, received his PhD in anthropology from the London School of Economics and is a professor at Columbia University and European Graduate School Although he has published on medical anthropology, he is best known for his engagement with Marx s idea of commodity fetishism, especially in terms of the work of Walter Benjamin.

    631 thoughts on “Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study in Terror and Healing

    • The many wonderful, and often also absolutely gruesome, quotes and stories are so human and so conflicted and so vivid that they can almost add up on their own without the fingers of interpretation reaching in between. A thousand portraits of the South America Colonial situation and its players—rubber running from a tree, the stockade, the curse of a neighbor, the lie become truthThe bigger picture, all-time and all-globe picture, is how facts are created and sat upon us, not from the raw mate [...]


    • Healing terror? Can that be possible? I am afraid not for Colombia. We have missed our chance every time we try. What is this space of death? Taussig's speaking out of his personal yagé experience or Colombia's endemic culture of terror where the dead are speaking to the living? I would prefer to think is the former instead of the later, just because I refuse to use the word endemic. However, we do need to pay more attention to what our dead are saying. Even if active and selective forgetfulnes [...]


    • I read this one 20 years ago and I still think about it from time to time. Clearly one of the messiest ethnographies ever made, which isn't a criticism. Culture is itself something very messy and can be downright chaotic when things go wrong. This is a book about things gone wrong. A rubber company by colonial mandate sets up an operation in the heart of the jungle. Through Christian Western arrogance and even more through fear of being surrounded by savages, the colonials became the real savage [...]


    • Well it sure ain't Carlos Castenada, thank christ. Pretty dense (as in hard to read) anthropology with some eye-popping anecdotes/history thrown in, and laced with some dry yet mind-bending philosophizing on cultural relativity, and the intricate cultural interactions between oppressor & oppressed, colonizer & colonized, in ways that you probably haven't considered before. Like most academic texts, the first couple chapters are the best, but for the serious reader, slogging to the end pa [...]


    • Taussig's book is a masterpiece taking you on a vivid hallucinogenic journey though Colombian Putumayo's land of savagery. An anthropological classic distinguished from others by its magnetic pull, which draws you to its poetic and full of life description of the space of death. A pull so strong, you are happy to bury yourself within to read it again and again and again without ceasing to be ensorcelled.


    • Comprising documentary vignettes of the quasi-feudal colonization of Colombia through the terror-tactics of a baronial rubber industry at the dawn of the twentieth century, followed by an abrupt leap into the author's first-person recollections of his interlocutors and their recollections in the same places three-quarters of a century later, Taussig's study is in many ways about how the phenomenal experience of reality is a product of its (often politicized) social representations. It shows how [...]





    • bloody and weird and also dry. too much happening here. Not my textbook of choice, but important to someone that I respect, does that count?



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