The Forbidden Kingdom

The Forbidden Kingdom Blending historical chronicle fiction and commentary The Forbidden Kingdom brings together the seemingly unrelated lives of a twentieth century ship s radio operator and the sixteenth century Portu

  • Title: The Forbidden Kingdom
  • Author: Jan Jacob Slauerhoff Paul Vincent
  • ISBN: 9781906548889
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Paperback
  • Blending historical chronicle, fiction, and commentary, The Forbidden Kingdom brings together the seemingly unrelated lives of a twentieth century ship s radio operator and the sixteenth century Portuguese poet in exile Luis Camoes.Jacob Slauerhoff draws his reader into a dazzling world of exoticism, betrayal, and exile, where past and present merge and the possibility ofBlending historical chronicle, fiction, and commentary, The Forbidden Kingdom brings together the seemingly unrelated lives of a twentieth century ship s radio operator and the sixteenth century Portuguese poet in exile Luis Camoes.Jacob Slauerhoff draws his reader into a dazzling world of exoticism, betrayal, and exile, where past and present merge and the possibility of death is never far away.Born in The Netherlands in 1898, upon graduating from university Jacob Slauerhoff signed up as a ship s surgeon with the Dutch East India Company He was at sea throughout his life, voyaging to the Far East, Latin America, and Africa.

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      127 Jan Jacob Slauerhoff Paul Vincent
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      Posted by:Jan Jacob Slauerhoff Paul Vincent
      Published :2019-02-12T08:49:03+00:00

    About “Jan Jacob Slauerhoff Paul Vincent

    • Jan Jacob Slauerhoff Paul Vincent

      Slauerhoff was a Dutch author.He also published a few poetry works under the penname John Ravenswood.

    405 thoughts on “The Forbidden Kingdom

    • Slauerhoff heeft medicijnen gestudeerd en is scheepsarts geweest. Hij heeft gereisd naar Oost-Azië, naar Zuid-Amerika, ook heeft hij op Afrika gevaren. Deze ervaringen heeft hij ‘meegenomen’ in zijn poëzie en in zijn proza.In Het verboden rijk worden twee personages opgevoerd. Hun geschiedenissen hebben veel parallellen, zijn bijna elkaars spiegelbeeld. Mooi om die allengs te ontdekken. Hun levenshouding is vergelijkbaar, zowel de 16e-eeuwse Portugese dichter Camoës als de 19e-eeuwse Iers [...]


    • One of the delights of working your way though translated fiction award lists is you become exposed to a number of small independent publishers. As translated fiction makes up only a small part of the “consumable” market, it is primarily left to the small houses to produce the gems that sparkle on these lists. “The Forbidden Kingdom” is a case in point, produced by Pushkin Press, they tell us that “this book is part of the Pushkin Collection of paperbacks, designed to be as satisfying [...]


    • When I first saw the Best Translated Book Award shortlist this past Tuesday morning the biggest surprise to me was in the inclusion of Jan Jacob Slauerhoff’s 1932 novel The Forbidden Kingdom. Not because it doesn’t deserve its place along side the other nine finalists (oh boy does it ever), but because it’s such a difficult book to describe. With its many independent sides forever spinning in seemingly different directions, it feels like the literary equivalent of a Rubik’s Cube. As a re [...]


    • Volgens de achterflap raken in Het verboden rijk twee verhalen onontwarbaar verstrengeld. De beide verhalen spelen zich omstebeurt af in de 16e en de 20ste eeuw. En zijn deze verhalen reïncarnaties van elkaar? Of is het eerdere verhaal een product van de nachtmerries van de persoon uit het verhaal in de 20ste eeuw. Maar waar gaat het verhaal precies over? Zelfs na het lezen van dit dunne boekje is die vraag moeilijk te beantwoorden. Het leven zou ik zeggenHet boek van Slauerhoff is erg verwarre [...]



    • Bit of a lost gem, at least in English. Exciting nautical adventures, compelling co-main characters, fascinating conceit. Elliptical, elegant, and subtle. An attractive pageturner of a story yet simultaneously w/depth of character, formal unconventionality, and many layers. Confident and often unpretentiously poetic language. So why not a higher score? Partly cuz of thinness--incredibly difficult juggling act to fit all this into a short novel, and he succeeds, but does so at a length that some [...]


    • This book bears the (sometimes common) distinction of not deserving an honest review unless one has read it twice. And this is a problem. The tale is all over the place, but nevertheless I felt compelled to continue reading how the exiled 16th century poet would fare, even though he continued traveling to his inevitable doom. I was equally compelled by the story of the unnamed 19th century seaman, whose story actually merges with that of the poet, but not in the way one would expect. Still, the [...]


    • This is short and always interesting but takes awhile to see what the author is driving at, modernism and all. I picked this up as recommended among the Best Translated Book Award (it was written in Dutch in the 1930s), yet another new prize I've discovered discussed among the book blogs that furnish all sorts of stuff to read that I would likely near have heard (like The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the Folio Prize, which George Saunders just won and is supposed to be a more literary M [...]


    • This is a peculiar book: There is love, adventure, battles. And yet you feel that nothing much is really happening. The book is even quite boring, but you can't really stop reading because it fascinates. It was written in the 1930ies, so a few racist or definitely not woman-friendly passages which really grated on my nerves have to be put down to that. Also, I read it in German translation, so I may have lost a few nuances one could find in the original. I'm still undecided about it and might ha [...]


    • I found it very confusing and boring at some times. Some parts interested me, but those were a minority




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