Why Don't American Cities Burn?

Why Don t American Cities Burn At on the morning of August Herbert Manes fatally stabbed Robert Monroe known as Shorty in a dispute over five dollars It was a horrific yet mundane incident for the poor heavily Afri

  • Title: Why Don't American Cities Burn?
  • Author: Michael B. Katz
  • ISBN: 9780812243864
  • Page: 384
  • Format: Hardcover
  • At 1 27 on the morning of August 4, 2005, Herbert Manes fatally stabbed Robert Monroe, known as Shorty, in a dispute over five dollars It was a horrific yet mundane incident for the poor, heavily African American neighborhood of North Philadelphia one of seven homicides to occur in the city that day and yet not make the major newspapers For Michael B Katz, an urban hisAt 1 27 on the morning of August 4, 2005, Herbert Manes fatally stabbed Robert Monroe, known as Shorty, in a dispute over five dollars It was a horrific yet mundane incident for the poor, heavily African American neighborhood of North Philadelphia one of seven homicides to occur in the city that day and yet not make the major newspapers For Michael B Katz, an urban historian and a juror on the murder trial, the story of Manes and Shorty exemplified the marginalization, social isolation, and indifference that plague American cities.Introduced by the gripping narrative of this murder and its circumstances, Why Don t American Cities Burn charts the emergence of the urban forms that underlie such events Katz traces the collision of urban transformation with the rightward moving social politics of late twentieth and early twenty first century America He shows how the bifurcation of black social structures produced a new African American inequality and traces the shift from images of a pathological black underclass to praise of the entrepreneurial poor who take advantage of new technologies of poverty work to find the beginning of the path to the middle class He explores the reasons American cities since the early 1970s have remained relatively free of collective violence while black men in bleak inner city neighborhoods have turned their rage inward on one another rather than on the agents and symbols of a culture and political economy that exclude them.The book ends with a meditation on how the political left and right have come to believe that urban transformation is inevitably one of failure and decline abetted by the response of government to deindustrialization, poverty, and race How, Katz asks, can we construct a new narrative that acknowledges the dark side of urban history even as it demonstrates the capacity of government to address the problems of cities and their residents How can we create a politics of modest hope

    • È Why Don't American Cities Burn? || Ë PDF Download by ↠ Michael B. Katz
      384 Michael B. Katz
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      Posted by:Michael B. Katz
      Published :2019-012-03T12:32:03+00:00

    About “Michael B. Katz

    • Michael B. Katz

      Michael B. Katz Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Why Don't American Cities Burn? book, this is one of the most wanted Michael B. Katz author readers around the world.

    407 thoughts on “Why Don't American Cities Burn?

    • While not a breezy historical-narrative work, Katz is more apt to venture into the topic like a scientist. He poses a few hypothesis, and goes on to provide evidence in their favour by using oral accounts, census and demographic works, past works in the Urban Studies canon, as well as multiple primary source works. While it can sometimes feel like a bit of a slog to get through (man, does he love his comparative stats), he provides ample angles to examine the question put forth, and invites the [...]


    • More academic than I expected, but (as the epilogue states) Katz uses this work as a text for his urban crisis class. I thought I would get a more polemic work based on the title, but Katz does a good job of laying out the factors that have dampened violent urban actions since the 1960's. There's also a ton of enlightening demographics on African American movement and associated economic inequities and a fascinating chapter on the poor as entrepreneur (e.g, microfinance and asset building).


    • Katz himself said it best—this is a "coherent interpretation of contemporary urban America." It's also a love letter to urban studies and a concise primer for those interested in what lies at the intersection of urban and social policy. Read it.



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